News

March 17, 2017
 
Berkeley County Youth Report Center (STARS) and
Intensive Outpatient/Alternative Learning Program
Berkeley County’s new Youth Report Center and intensive Outpatient/ Alternative Learning Program is the end product of a year-long collaboration between the Board of Child Care, the WV Department of Education’s Office of Diversion and Transition Program (formerly OIEP), the WV Division of Juvenile Services and Berkeley County Schools.  This project began as an idea to address a service gap in our community.  During the course of the year all four partners works closely together and consistently placed the needs of children in the center of the table and focused on what is in their best interest.  After numerous meetings and strategizing sessions, the program was developed, the MOUs were agreed upon and we are enthusiastically kicking off the program today which is the first of its kind in WV.
Youth Reporting Center youth who are referred through the juvenile service system as an alternative sentence to incarceration.  Youth will attend full days of school, 5 days per week and intensive therapy services, provided by master’s level clinicians, will be woven into their school day.  Family therapy can also be provided at a location convenient for them.  Transportation to the program will be provided by the STARS program.  Probation officers can refer to this program and youth will be ordered into the program by a judge.  Referrals can be made directly to the Board of Care Admissions Office or to the STARS program. All referrals will be reviewed promptly by the Admissions Review Team which is comprised of a representative from STARS and one from BCC and one from the BCC School.  Requests to specific programs will be reviewed following the same process and will be honored whenever possible.

2017-03-17 Alternative Learning Program Signing (All Pictures)_Page_08.jpg2017-03-17 Alternative Learning Program Signing (All Pictures)_Page_11.jpg


July 29, 2016
Mission West Virginia
Youth of the WV Division of Juvenile Services are Excited to Participate in the Giving Back with HeART Auction!
 
A few words from the WV Division of Juvenile Services... 

Community service is an important part of our programs and this event is special in that it allows our youth to actually help other kids who have family situations similar to them.  Many of our youth have parents who are/were incarcerated and many have been in foster care.  We also have several youth who do not have a family to return to upon release from DJS custody and are quite anxious about their future.  Given all of this, our kids are happy to help Mission WV with this great cause by donating items they have made in order to be auctioned off to raise money for scholarships.   Examples of items they are making are: wooden clocks cut out in the shape of WV, para-cord bracelets, birdhouses, afghans, pillows, quilt (made with the various crochet squares that different residents have made – see picture), wooden projects, canvas art, wreaths, books of poems and other items handmade by our kids. 
 
We at Mission West Virginia are also very excited that youth of the WV Division of Juvenile Services are contributing to Giving Back with HeART. We are so grateful to all of the artists who make this event possible through their donations. Through art, we are creating change together!  
 
Save the date: October 20, 2016 at 6 p.m.
Where: Culture Center, Charleston WV 
To learn more, visit our Facebook page at www.missionwv.org/FrameworksMWV 
If you can't attend,  you can still help by sharing this event with your Facebook friends.  
 
HeART.jpg


 
March 1, 2016
Charleston Gazette

Kanawha County Youth Reporting Center 

 
Daily Mail editorial: Produce pedalers program solves multiple problems Gardening has many benefits for children, the Gazette-Mail’s garden guru John Porter wrote in his Sunday column back in 2013. “Gardening ... reduces stress and anxiety, improves learning and reduces negative behaviors in children ... Gardening can improve social skills and behavior in children, even those who have been identified with behavioral and social disorders.”

 
Now the Kanawha County Youth Reporting Center has begun a program to apply those benefits toward at-risk youth. Called Produce Pedalers, the program will provide an alternative outlet and help the youth make a community-wide impact, the Gazette-Mail’s Elaina Sauber reported Monday. With technical assistance from the West Virginia State University Extension Office, teens at the Youth Reporting Center will build and maintain community gardens in a vacant lot next to the center, along Central Avenue on Charleston’s West Side. This summer, the students will harvest and deliver bags of produce through CSAs — community-supported agriculture shares — to neighbors and local businesses on the West Side on bikes. Best of all, they’ll get paid to harvest and deliver. Besides the benefits Porter wrote about several years ago, this program has the potential to provide disenfranchised and often socially challenged youth a sense of value and get them engaged in their neighborhood.

 
The Kanawha County students will also participate in a bicycle safety course with the Charleston Police Department and hone their customer service skills by marketing the CSAs to West Side residents in hopes of finding subscribers. Truancy, substance abuse, breaking and entering, felonies — there are many reasons youth are ordered or referred to the Reporting Center.
“Most of the kids we get, this is probably their last chance before they either go to a placement in or out of state, or to a detention center,” Program Director John James told Sauber. WVSU extention agents like Jenny Totten believe Produce Pedalers will decrease the likelihood that its participants will end up back in the juvenile justice system.“It’s letting them see the world isn’t against them,” Totten said. “This is about these kids finally having a chance to produce something they’re proud of.” Good job by the Reporting Center and all involved to develop a program to help the youth — like the fruits and vegetables they’ll plant — grow and benefit the community.

Gardening 2.jpg
Gardening 4.jpg